Articles from Kate Miller

Local Anti-Human Trafficking Non-Profit Provides Teen Prevention Education Program

Kate Miller, Virginia Free Citizen

Anti-human trafficking organization, Richmond Justice Initiative (RJI), is spreading a message of human trafficking prevention through its award-winning Prevention Project® program.

Its 6-lesson academic curriculum “focuses on educating teens on the issues of human trafficking locally and globally, developing healthy safe awareness and boundaries, strengthening character and fostering leadership amongst the students,” program materials state.

“The goal of the Prevention Project curriculum is to prevent human trafficking, the sale and exploitation of human beings for profit, from occurring in our schools, among our nation’s youth.”

Continue reading


Human Trafficking Prevention Education Program Earns Corporate Financial Support

Kate Miller, Virginia Free Citizen

Anti-human trafficking organization, Richmond Justice Initiative (RJI), is spreading a message of human trafficking prevention through its signature, award-winning Prevention Project® program.  A team comprised of survivors of teen human trafficking, law enforcement, educators, and anti-trafficking experts have developed this program.  The Prevention Project curriculum was designed to reach middle and high school students in their classrooms, educating teens about human trafficking in an effort to not only raise awareness but also protect them from this growing global crime.

According to the US Department of Justice, the average age of entry for someone forced into sex slavery is between 11 and 14 for girls and boys, and the Center for Missing and Exploited Children states that 300,000 US children are thought to be at risk for sexual exploitation each year.

Continue reading


Food Freedom Task Force Takes Legislative Initiative

Task force members met with industry lobbyists on April 15 in Crozet, Va. Pictured from left to right: Lindsay Reames, Eric Paulson, Brad Copenhaver, Randall Anderson, Joel Salatin and Lois Smith. Photo courtesy of The Virginia Food Freedom Task Force.

Task force members met with industry lobbyists on April 15 in Crozet, Va. Pictured from left to right: Lindsay Reames, Eric Paulson, Brad Copenhaver, Randall Anderson, Joel Salatin and Lois Smith. Photo courtesy of The Virginia Food Freedom Task Force.

The Virginia Food Freedom Task Force began its fight for the rights of Virginia’s small farmers and home food producers after House Bill 135, introduced by Delegate Robert Bell, R-Charlottesville, failed to pass during the 2014 General Assembly session.

HB135, also known as the Food Freedom Act, sought to allow the sale of foods by a farm with 10 or fewer employees or by a private home if the food products are sold directly to consumers and if the product is labeled with the producer’s name and address, ingredients and a disclosure statement declaring that the food product is not subject to Virginia’s food safety laws or regulations.

Virginia small farmer Bernadette Barber, of Tall Trees Farm, was directly involved in the conception of the Food Freedom Act and formed the task force. Continue reading


Virginia Farm Embraces Innovative Alternative Agriculture

Joel Salatin is a third generation farmer, as well as an author, speaker and advocate for farm freedoms and alternative agriculture.

Joel Salatin is a third generation farmer, as well as an author, speaker and advocate for farm freedoms and alternative agriculture. Photo by Rachel Salatin.

Joel Salatin and his family operate Polyface Farms in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. The farm has become an example of innovative non-industrial food production for farmers and consumers looking for an escape from America’s conventional agricultural model.

Polyface produces pastured poultry and eggs, forage-based rabbits and forestry products. It also produces “salad bar” beef from cows who eat only forage, are pasture-raised and are contained by electric fencing. Additionally, Polyface produces pigerator pork, which are pigs that aerate bedding to create compost.

Salatin, a third generation farmer who grew up at Polyface Farms, educates others about the importance of natural, ecological farming practices as a speaker and author of nine books. Continue reading


Farm Recap: Slow Grown in Virginia

A cow at the Slow Grown in Virginia farm.

A cow at Slow Grown in Virginia roams the 50-acre plus farm.

Brian and Kim Criley operate their farm business, Slow Grown in Virginia, on the more than 50-acre Spring Hill Farm in Caroline County, Va. They produce natural herbal products (including teas), seasonal produce, bath and body care products, homemade baked goods, crafts and home décor products, as well as pasture-raised pork, poultry and eggs. Slow Grown in Virginia does not use any herbicides, pesticides, hormones, chemical growth enhancers or genetically modified organisms.

Slow Grown in Virginia is a modern-day version of an old-fashioned, diversified family farm.

“We’re kind of the ones that are crazy enough to try to do it like every farm used to do it,” Brian said, “where you had most of everything and tried to make it all a symbiotic relationship.” Continue reading



Kate Miller

About Kate Miller

Kate Miller is a multimedia journalist and graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University. She received a Bachelor of Science in Mass Communications with a broadcast journalism concentration. She attended Smith College in Massachusetts before attending VCU. This semester, she is reporting on the General Assembly for the VCU Capital News Service.